What Were The Results Of The Munich Agreement

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On 22 September, Chamberlain, who wanted to travel to Bad Godesberg for further conversations just before his plane to Germany, told the press who met him there that “my goal is peace in Europe, I hope this journey is the way to that peace.” [32] Chamberlain came to Cologne, where he received a big reception with a German band that played “God Save the King” and Germans who offered flowers and gifts to Chamberlain. [32] Chamberlain had calculated that full acceptance of the German annexation of all Sudetenland without reduction would force Hitler to accept the agreement. [32] When Hitler heard, he replied, “Does this mean that the Allies have accepted the transfer of the Sudetenland to Germany?”, Chamberlain replied “Exactly,” to which Hitler replied by shaking his head, saying that the Allies` offer was insufficient. He told Chamberlain that he wanted Czechoslovakia to be completely dissolved and its territories redistributed to Germany, Poland and Hungary, and told Chamberlain to take them or leave them. [32] Chamberlain was upset by this statement. [32] Hitler added to Chamberlain that the assassination of Germans since his last meeting, 15 Czechoslovakia, of which Hitler was part of the assassination of Germans, made the situation unbearable for Germany. [32] One aspect of the immense agitation of the last fourteen days must affect anyone who thinks about his or her history. In the three most powerful countries in Central and Eastern Europe, people had no right to know what was said and done outside. There seems to have been very little news in Russia. In Germany and Italy, the message was deliberately falsified while it was not repressed.

The German people were not to know the embassy of President Roosevelt. The Italian people were led to believe that Chamberlain agreed with Hitler and was only putting pressure on Benes. One of his speeches gave them a false version. The question of the referendum was the only serious snag in Munich. The “Big Four” could not agree on the areas in which the referendum is to take place. The matter was referred to a committee composed of the ambassadors of the United Kingdom, France and Italy in Berlin, a Czech official and Mr von Weizs-cker of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The German demand and demand will certainly be met – that all those who reside in the area planned for the October 1918 referendum will have the right to vote.